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Today on Grow Live, Matt Johnson and Renia Carsillo sit down with Digital Producer Lief Thomason and talk video. And why bad video isn’t better than no video at all. Check out this week’s show for Lief’s helpful tips for making videos customers love.

Watch, listen or read now and learn more about:
  • Beginning your video journey with a smartphone
  • Matt’s thoughts on brain scans and storytelling
  • How YouTube functions much like Google search
  • How the industrial buyer's journey has changed
  • The digital production team’s thoughts on the science of the creative process

“The only way to have an audience is through consistency,” — Lief Thomason, Digital Producer at SMS


Check out these additional resources:

Today’s call to action:

Comment with a link to your latest video. Lief will take a look and offer 3 suggestions for easy improvements you can use to generate more engagement!

Don’t forget to visit us next week for a super nerdy discussion on effectively using co-op dollars.

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Read the Grow Live transcript... 

Renia:

Hey, welcome back to Grow Live everybody. I am here today with Lief Thomson, you may remember him, he's usually behind the camera. He is our digital producer responsible for all of our video content and of course Matt Johnson is with us this week, our CMO and managing partner. And I'm Renia, your director of digital strategy here at SMS, welcome guys.

Lief:

Hey, glad to be back.

Renia:

Glad to have you in front of the camera. So, remember we promised you if you've been with us for a while that we would come in and share what we've learned every few weeks. So Lief's been on the show a couple of times you can go back to what like six and 12-ish?

Lief:

Yep.

Renia:

Like episode 6, episode 12 and see some feedback on what we've learned as we go through this process. We've invited Lief back in today for episode 20-

Lief:

Four, 24.

Renia:

Four.

Lief:

That's crazy.

Renia:

Six months.

Lief:

Is that?

Matt:

Yeah, it's been six months.

Lief:

Oh my gosh, that's insane, where'd it go?

Renia:

So if you're new and you haven't seen the 23 other episodes, you can watch them on YouTube, you can grab the transcripts from our blog, listen to the podcast. If you go to growwithsms.com, you can get access to whatever viewership is your choice and go back and binge watch. You could watch Grow Live for an entire day now.

Matt:

24 hours, yeah. If you want it. If you do that, let me know. I will send you something. Bottle of rum or something, you're just crazy.

Renia:

I recommend Grow Live with a bottle of rum actually, I think that would be-

Matt:

Yeah, it's funner that way for sure.

Renia:

Leave us a comment, drop us a review and we might have some fun stuff for you but I want to dive right in ... Well, actually, did you want to say anything before I dive right in?

Matt:

No, no, we're ready to do this. We wanted to bring Lief on as you said, this is all about us pausing the typical life of the show to bring on Lief so that we can go behind the scenes. When we first began this thing Renia, we talked about how our desire was to be transparent because as a marketing agency, a growth agency, we're doing the same thing you guys are doing day in and day out and we felt like if we could let you kind of see behind the curtain in terms of what our strategy is, get inside our minds on how we're helping to grow, the things we're doing to help grow our own business, that might be helpful to you guys as you're out there growing yours. So, that's the purpose of this. This is the behind the scenes edition and excited to start talking about this.

Renia:

Awesome. I think that's a great point to bring up is like we need to probably remind especially a lot of our new viewers, why did we do this crazy thing? To do a Facebook Live show every week anyway. What was the point of all this?

Matt:

I'm going to take that one and then I think the rest of these questions will be really directed towards Lief, but the reason why I thought this was a good idea and in fact it was scary believe me, in the very beginning it was very scary of getting up here in front of a live audience and knowing that the content would be recorded and produced into a podcast and a video show and also utilized for our blog and email marketing, was because like you guys probably, my own resources were limited.

 

So, we're out there ... In the agency world, to give you guys kind of a better understanding, there's an expression used a lot that the cobbler's kids don't have any shoes. The idea is that we're so good at making marketing strategies and executing them that we don't do it for ourselves. A lot of times that's been true in the past but we decided that if we were going to market our business, so we were going to spend some serious effort in terms of growing, that we were going to do it in a way that was affordable.

 

We thought, how could we do that and we came up with the concept of a live show so that there was minimal preparation on our end as kind of the stars of the show, say that term loosely. It was a minimal preparation for us. In fact, some days like we literally just come up with the agenda the day of the show. That may be a little crazy but it allows us the flexibility to plan it out if we have the ability to plan it out ahead of time but if we need to quickly put together an outline before the show goes live that day, we can do that.

 

We can utilize the same resources that we already have available in-house, we have the studio, it wasn't hard for us to you know quickly put a table together and a microphone and get at it. In addition to that, one hour of us just running our mouths turns into all kinds of content for our own marketing strategy. So there's the blog, there's the podcast audio, there's the YouTube video and of course the blog and all of those media pieces that we create are all put into an email newsletter that goes out every week, and not to mention the social aspect of this.

 

Creating a ton of great educational content on a very small marketing budget and that was why we did it this way. We're not sure if it's exactly the right approach, we're learning as we go, we look at the analytics but I will tell you this guys, it is working. We have had leads come from the show, we have had business come from the show, so we've gradually up the ante a little bit over time and because we know that it's paying off. So, that's why we did it.

Renia:

Awesome. I think a key point is if you go back and you look at some of the past shows. We do have a studio space, we have microphones and beautiful cameras and stuff like that but with something like a Facebook Live there's availability to do it even when you don't have those things accessible to you. Because we've done shows where Matt and I have both been on the road in different cities, we've done shows while Lief and his team were out of the office. So, even though we're usually here in front of a beautiful studio setup, there's the ability to keep that consistency going even if all you have is a smartphone.

Matt:

I'll say one other thing and then we get to Lief's question here in a minute but just like how Lief and his team put together a ton of redundancies in terms of the production of the show, there was a lot of redundancies that we put together in terms of actually executing the show. Because if there's not people up here to talk, there's no show. And what we realized was that if it was just your show and it was just you getting up here, there would be weeks where there would be no show. And if it was just my show and I was the only one contributing content, there would be weeks where there'd be no show.

 

So there's been times when I've done the ninja takeover, there's been times when you've done the nerd takeover, we've done many episodes because maybe we were a little time crunched for that week and I feel like it's worked out well because no matter what rain or shine, Grow Live has happened every week. Not to toot my own horn but I'm very proud of that but mostly because of you guys being committed, the whole team having the redundancies in place to be able to make it happen every week is really critical.

Lief:

You know it's really important to make sure that you have some kind of regular schedule in that way because the only way to truly build good audience is by having some consistency. That goes across the board, whether you're doing Facebook Live videos, if you create a YouTube channel, if you're even doing a blog, you've got to have consistency otherwise there's nothing for me to come back to, they don't know what to expect, there's no audience without consistency.

Matt:

Right.

Renia:

I haven't tested this with video but we see this a lot with blogging where I've seen people that are blogging like say every Tuesday for years and then they go two weeks without doing it and it takes six months to get back. Because people get so conditioned to where you're at and the only way to keep that consistency up is to have those redundancies in place. Matt and I have talked each other into the show some weeks where we've been like, maybe we should just skip it because it's really busy right now and one of us is like no, no, no. Having multiple people involved has been really key for keeping the consistency up. But Lief, tell us why is video such a good medium for this educational content? I mean, why not just write about it?

Lief:

Oh, my gosh. Think about how much engagement there has to be for somebody to sit down and read through the same amount of content that you could do in a five-minute video where they're pacing and timing it out for you already. You have more than just black lines on a page to look at, at that point too. You've got engagement with people, as a people we are social and so to see somebody else talking and engaging that way is also going to go ahead and bring you in a little bit deeper, a little bit better. Those are some of the immediate things that I think of when I'm encouraging somebody to go to video. Every report, every marketer right now is going to tell you video is top performing content. There's really no reason not to at this point.

Matt:

I was just listening to a study that was done and I don't remember the scientific term for it but it's the scan, there's a brain scan that they can do now where they can in real time when people are conscious do a scan of the brain and when human beings are watching another human being tell a story, what happens is the same parts of the brain that are firing in the storyteller start firing in the listener. It's totally a phenomenon that is just a human phenomenon like no other creature has that ability. We've been like evolved and designed to like have this ability to look at another human being read their face, listen to what they're saying and that's a tremendous aspect of communication.

 

Is that face-to-face, watching another human being look at you in the ... So even if you're looking at me through the camera, you're looking at my face, you're listening to my words, you're empathizing with me and you are building a connection that simply can't come across in other forms of communication.

Renia:

Makes complete sense.

Matt:

That's why I think we're living in a world as we become like more advanced and more connected, we're living in a world where communication is becoming more and more prevalent through video and if you look at social media, it just makes sense why video as a medium has become so popular. Because it's easy to now share ideas, it's easy to share that human experience with people across a larger audience and when you think about search, look at YouTube, right?

Lief:

Yeah, and if you're more concerned about the numbers than the empathy then consider that there's this huge market that you're just not tapping that everybody else is in. It would be the equivalent essentially now of refusing to get on the internet. It's just silly to not try to get some kind of content out there that is reaching that audience. It's a massive audience share. You're not talking about a pool that dwindles down as more people or on, you have the same potential as anybody else. Even the tens of millions subscriber channels.

Renia:

YouTube is, to go into the nerd realm of video, YouTube is a search engine. It is owned by Google and it is ran like a search engine in a number of ways. It is also the second largest search engine next to Google, so it's very powerful because both of those algorithms work together so a lot of times your videos can get found in a Google search easier than your written content can and you also can be found on a YouTube search. So, if you're missing that video piece, you're really missing a big piece of your overall search strategy.

Matt:

Getting back to the idea of the industrial buyer's journey and the changes that are happening out there guys, just think about the way that you go about either finding products were solutions or fixing things like repairing equipment, maintaining equipment. All of these things today, if you're honest with yourself, you know that you go and look up a video and the question is, who's getting found. Those content builders that are getting found are the ones that are growing in today's world. It's the way that you differentiate yourself from the competition today and that's why we put so much of a focus on it, that's why we invested so much in it.

 

I mean not many ... I don't think many agencies in our space have the video production team that we have and it's because we knew that as the industrial buyers journey was changing it was important to adapt alongside of that and make sure that the content that was created was perfect for that new generation of buyers. That's how it really ties into sales but I think now I'd like to ask you guys to bear with us ... We're going to do something pretty cool here. We're going to do an Inception moment. I love that movie Inception, so at a dream inside of a dream. Well, today guys we are going to show you a marketing about how to do video marketing inside of a live video about video marketing. Is your mind blown yet? If not, it will be. Go ahead and roll that video that Lief put together, Brandon.

Renia:

I had to let you do that.

Brandon:

Yeah, card is full. I think.

Lief:

I formatted it.

Renia:

This is a live show.

Lief:

Grab a new one.

Renia:

Welcome to our live show. While he's doing that, I'll actually just give you a quick-

Matt:

Wait, Brandon are we live or?

Brandon:

It's the video.

Matt:

The video's rolling?

Renia:

It is.

Lief:

We're good.

Renia:

I thought you meant like, okay. I was like, I'm going to have to come up with some bullshit here.

Matt:

Beautiful outtake right there, I hope we caught that.

Lief:

This one's rolling, this is good.

Renia:

I had to let you say that because I wasn't going to be able to say that with straight face.

Matt:

You incept an inception?

Renia:

Yeah. I'm not good at jokes unless they happen by accident.

Lief:

I made her say a joke when you were gone.

Renia:

Yeah, and it was cheesy.

Matt:

This is the last video of 2017, just joking.

Renia:

JK.

Matt:

You actually came across very convincing. A little too convincing. It's dropped.

Lief:

It's not full?

Brandon:

I don't know why it's stopped.

Lief:

That's good, bad card.

Male:

Try it again.

Matt:

Those cards die.

Lief:

Yeah.

Matt:

They don't last forever.

Lief:

... A bunch. About time to order more.

Matt:

The video, you remember the video right? Where he teaches you how to put together a quick video.

Lief:

What were the main points on that? On the video.

Matt:

You're the one who created the video you know-

Lief:

That was like almost a year ago.

Renia:

A long time, I was going to say, like that's hard to remember.

Lief:

Should be in the vlog, I put it on there. That video is still like our second or third best performing video on the YouTube channel.

Matt:

So you said, it all comes down a project management question, what do we make.

Lief:

How do we make it?

Matt:

Question, how do we make it? Developing a plan, ask yourself-

Lief:

The camera isn't it? It's the camera isn't it?

Matt:

What's the problem? How does this solve the problem better? And then question number three was what do we do with our video? How do we get it out?

Lief:

Restart it, see if you can get it going again. Is the video almost done? Try replacing the battery too. If you have time.

Brandon:

Well, it's staying on.

Lief:

Yeah, I'm just trying to think of any other things that could be wrong with it. I think that one is my camera descended into the CF anyways.

Matt:

You got the next questions to give Lief-

Renia:

Yep.

Matt:

Okay.

Lief:

Looks like we're close to the end.

Matt:

Last time you turned the screen around so we could see it.

Lief:

I can see it on Joe's screen right now.

Male:

You can see what?

Lief:

Joe's screen. Still got about 45 seconds.

Brandon:

We can do like a 20-second warning.

Lief:

Were you recording just then? So it's just the camera turning off? Did you switch the battery yet?

Matt:

Still got time?

Lief:

20 seconds. We're right about 10 seconds behind.

Brandon:

Five seconds.

Renia:

I don't know Lief, that video looked pretty slick. So is my video production going to cost like a really big-time suck and a lot of equipment and ...

Lief:

That's everybody's question right now, I hear that so often from so many places. It's like asking in the world of video production, the most common question out there is what camera did you use for that? And every time somebody asked what camera should I be using for my production, the answer is always the same from like the major producers like whatever gets the job done. Really that's what it's about. It comes back to this like project management and planning.

 

You can do big-budget stuff but you've got some key things you got to make sure it's going to do. It needs to last forever basically, you can't have something that's going to be dated in six months that you spent $30,000 on. That doesn't make sense, right. A lot of people are doing that. It's kind of silly. It's a product that they stopped selling or one that they just flops and they decide to trash the whole thing or it would even be like a seasonal video like why would you do that when it comes to doing something like this, you mentioned it before.

 

If you've got your phone on you, you don't have to start at something big. We used what we had at first when we first started doing the show and it was a little bit higher scale than where somebody else might wind up starting but that's just because it was there. We've upgraded since then but there's a lot of reasons for that because we have seen results on it. It's something that's lasted that we know we're going to consistently do.

 

At some point you go, okay, it's worth putting a little bit of budget into. You really have to talk about when you're talking about how much money you're spending on video like what's your plan. Have a strategy for the videos you're going to make and let your budget be determined by that just like any other aspect of your company and what you do. It's not any different. This isn't the Wild Wild West; your processes are in place already.

Matt:

Some marketing departments do run like the Wild Wild West but we won't go there. I will say though that you're right and that we don't ... I think it's important to budget according to the purpose of the video. Like if it is a small product that doesn't equate to a huge net margin for you. Like, maybe that's not the place to invest in a $5000 video project. Maybe that's an area where you're going to just get up with an iPhone, with a decent microphone and capture that video of like a sales rep talking about the features and benefits.

 

Maybe that can be as effective if not more effective than a big production where you got to have the right lighting and the right microphones and the right equipment. I mean, it's just you got to really think about what you're looking to do. For us it was easy to start with better equipment than somebody else but we could have easily started the show with an iPhone and a couple of like Lavalier mics, right?

Lief:

Yep.

Renia:

That's a good question because I know I took a photography class in college, the extent of my photography experience. And he made us for like the first two weeks go out with a poster board and a disposable camera that was back when we still used film, back in the Stone Age, but you did need the poster board and the disposable camera. You couldn't materialize and at that time a darkroom but you couldn't materialize a photo out of thin air. So what is like very baseline what someone needs to get started?

Lief:

I think in our like advanced age, your phone. Really like the baseline like you don't have to do anything else because you've got it, is just a smartphone. You don't even have to spend the 700 to $1000 on like one of the nicer ones, there's cheap ones you can get at wherever down the road that are going to cost you a hundred bucks.

Matt:

But you know everybody's got a thousand dollar iPhone.

Renia:

If you're a marketing manager, you have an iPhone or whatever, few components, I don't know-

Matt:

Everybody's got a thousand but here's the thing is that I don't think it's the ... I think that that is like a red herring, like that is not the issue. The issue is not what equipment do I need, it's always having the courage to just start talking. Like, for example, I have my iPhone and I have like a dashboard holder in my car and today after I drop my kids off at school I had this idea for a new product come in my head and I quickly recorded a live video for just my leadership team to see. How easy was that? Well, it required me to press one button and drive and talk.

 

They were able to get my they were able to extract a thought out of my brain a lot faster than I could have ever written it into a memo or an email right. So that's an example of just how easy it is but I don't think everybody has the confidence or conviction in what they're selling or what they're talking about to actually get in front of the camera. I think that and we don't have time to go down the whole psychology of it but wouldn't you say like it's not about how polished you are, it's not about your equipment, it's about your ability to communicate.

Lief:

It is, it absolutely is one of the first points that that video we just had them watch talks about is decide what you want to say then say it. Those two actions come together and you're not going to do anything, you're not going to start ever if you don't do those two. It sounds really like stupid simple but really genuinely. Like, put it on paper and then say it. That's the stepping stone, from there it really just gets easier in a way.

Matt:

It's like when we talk about with website design now. It's not a matter of building this perfect thing and then saying, okay we're done now let's leave it alone, its building something that is good and then continually working on it as we get better and better over time. That's really what we've done with the show, we started something that was good enough, we got it out and then we started building on it over time. I guess the next question on your agenda Renia is to talk about what changes we've made to the production of the show. How have we improved the production level and the quality of the video?

Lief:

Just a few things since we first began and I certainly hope people have noticed the changes we've put a lot of effort into it. We've dressed the set slightly different just by adding some color and lighting and things to the background here to make it a little more engaging and Grow Live, get it?

Matt:

Fits the-

Lief:

In case nobody got the joke before, right?

Matt:

Fits the brand, right.

Lief:

We have made an investment in better lighting, which is something that benefits us in a lot of ways especially as a company that does video services so, it's something that makes sense for us. It's like I said before, we've figured out that this is something that lasts that drives leads for us and it's worth some of the investments. We didn't start off with everything, we started off with exactly what we had and then we've upped it since then. I think even just those few small things that we've done have made just a world of difference. It's showing its value.

Matt:

So we're like, for example, when we run an ad now for the show and we'll get into that in a second I think, talking about how to promote the show and optimize it a little bit but when we run that ad now and it comes across people's screens for the first time, it's a nice beautiful production, it looks sharp, the definition is better quality, there's a better depth on us as the subjects in the video and it's got the richer look in color and that's something that will generate longer views and ultimately get people to watch the show and perhaps subscribe.

 

I think the production quality has improved a lot and we're starting to see that now in conjunction with the other thing that he's doing, right Renia. So what are you guys working on behind the scenes in nerd town to help the video actually get seen because we talk about this a lot. It's one thing to produce a video; it's another thing to get it seen by the people you want to see it.

Renia:

Absolutely. Lief and I have been working a lot on optimization strategies to get more views particularly post live for the videos. So, Lief you want to talk a little bit about what you've been doing from a producer standpoint and then I'll talk a little bit about the optimization of it.

Lief:

My efforts have been solely focused on YouTube performance and building that audience. And part of what every skilled SEO teacher will tell you is that you need to have some kind of audience engagement. Step one is that we are starting to add, like I was hammering on last week these questions right. That you're following up with some kind of question that's going to engage the audience and if you leave whatever you're doing immediately with that question and just say hey, you know what, in the comments section, what do you think about this or what do you do too et cetera, et cetera. Whatever fits the content of what you just were talking about.

 

So, by posing a question you're building this possibility of engagement now, which for YouTube, that's one of the biggest ways to get the rank that YouTube is looking for, is through engagement.

Matt:

You mean commenting.

Lief:

By getting those comments, that's right and then you commenting back with-

Matt:

Comments and likes, yes.

Lief:

Comments, likes, subscribes, asking for those likes and subscribes. Everybody's doing that and sometimes people just forget. They just consume, consume, consume. Netflix isn't asking for that kind of thing, Hulu is not asking for that kind of thing, so sometimes you can just go to the next thing without going, that was really great and realizing I have a way that I can help promote this stuff for them by just pushing two buttons. Super simple to do.

Matt:

It's also make sure that if you enjoy a show, if you enjoy Grow Live and you're subscribed to the YouTube channel, make sure that you're not going to miss any episodes.

Lief:

That's right.

Matt:

That's important too because if you are a fan of the show and you enjoy the content on it, you make sure that there's always a reminder there to go back and watch the next episode.

Lief:

If you're subscribing, you're going to get email reminders and it's going to show up in your feed and yeah there's a lot that is a benefit to the audience as a result of that. So, part of it is the engagement, a part of it is just basics looking at what is your title. Is it attention-grabbing title that also relates to the content. You can't trick Google in this way at this point anymore. You have to have something that is relating. It obviously needs to have some kind of attention-grabbing call to action or what is like the summary point of why somebody's coming to this, which takes a little bit of SEO research that you're going to do on YouTube and then following that up with the last things. Making sure you have the right tags.

 

Properly written tags can not only get you searched easier but also sitting next to videos that have thousands or millions of views on them. There's always the recommended videos on the bar next to videos on YouTube, you want to sit there next to something that has the same content as yours because that's your next best opportunity to really get seen. Then obviously the annotations is another big one to keep in mind.

Matt:

We haven't like magically fixed all of it right, but one thing that I've noticed is that our tags and titles have gotten a lot better and we saw an immediate increase in views just from doing that, right Renia?

Renia:

Yeah, I'm always on the headlines, I was just before we came on here talking to our copywriter about headlines and about pulling the lead out of things. Words still matter so you need good words attached to your video. I think one of the things that Lief and I both just die a little inside whenever we see is like a really beautifully done $10,000 video or something that just has a one-word title or no description or like you might as well have flush that money down the toilet at that moment right.

 

This is a place if you have an in-house writer to use your writer, if you don't this is a place where it's well worth the investment a couple hundred dollars for a copywriter, I mean probably a hundred dollars would get you a good YouTube description and a good title and those should be related to your overall keyword strategy. There are some specifications for YouTube specific but you also need to relate them to your overall strategy because remember Google will rank your YouTube videos very well.

 

Also, a lot of the optimization that Lief has done recently is unique to YouTube because we are producing the show on Facebook and what is important for Facebook Live and the subtleties of Facebook Live versus YouTube are different things. What I see a lot of people doing is not ... They're just pushing the same exact content to every platform and that really doesn't work very well very often.

 

For instance, on a Facebook Live video, it takes Facebook a little bit to grab your ... To alert your audience that you're live and grab them together, so we'll start off a Facebook Live by like a little bit of back-and-forth and we'll introduce everybody and really what we're doing is eating up time for the audience to begin to gather. But on YouTube it's exactly the opposite because it isn't live most of the time, you are playing instantaneously. You need to hook them in three seconds. So you'll notice-

Matt:

Eight second attention span, that's what you have.

Renia:

Yeah. You'll notice that in our last few videos, Lief has been having us after production record a little hook to go on the YouTube video specifically to allow it to optimize better for YouTube. Because, you're going to lose people in that beginning banter. Same thing as like on Facebook we're asking for likes or comments or shares or something like that, the language can be different on different platforms. For instance that doesn't mean anything in the podcast feed. So, a lot of what we've been doing for optimization is getting better about making specific actions that go with that platform. So, we're creating one piece of content that can go out everywhere but it does need some subtle adjustments to be optimized for all these different platforms.

Matt:

That's the difference between when we started in the beginning versus where we are today. In the beginning we just copied and pasted across the podcast and the YouTube and Facebook and now we are looking at improving each one of those separately.

Renia:

If you're in marketing, I just want to like say, I feel like we really need to say this to a marketing manager who's trying to convince your boss or your sales director, whoever it is to do something like this. You're not probably going to be able to convince them in the beginning to do all this huge list of subtle things. So that's not what you do, you sell them the least common denominator. You sell them like you're going to get on this show or we're going to do this show for like 10 minutes and all you're going to have to do is walk on the camera and walk off.

 

Then after you've done it a few times after they start to get comfortable, after they start to see some results, so maybe they even like it, that's when you start to layer in these things because the pain gets less the longer you do it and the more results you see. So start small, don't try to start with all of these things. I don't think we would have been able to manage it if we tried to start everything at the beginning, right?

Lief:

Right. A lot of the main content this part has become so automatic that it's a little bit easier now for me to take up some time at the end if I have to. I should just add this too, you don't have to make unique bits of content to go around this piece for all these places it's going to live every single time. I'm always trying to find a way to do something once and do it right. If I've got my end card on YouTube, I'm going to make something that works for every single episode instead of having to redo that every single time.

Matt:

Awesome.

Renia:

So, to wrap us up, can you guys tell us a little bit about how this is working in our marketing funnel? Like where does the live show sit in our marketing funnel and how do we take the people that are watching the show and convert them into leads for the company?

Matt:

Speaking of convincing your boss, this is really where you have to tie it all together to actual revenue. Because remember your job as the marketing team is to increase revenue, you are on team revenue. Your sales team is your partner, you're doing one half, they're doing the other half. Your half is the top of the funnel, so that buyers journey that we talk about a lot, we have to be able to create engaging content at the very top of this funnel and that's really what Grow Live is for us. It's a top of the funnel, come in, the waters warm, get to know us a little bit and we're going to add more value than you asked for.

 

You didn't pay for this content; we're going to give it to you for free. This is us paying it forward. This is us giving back to our community, our industry. That is the top of the funnel. The key is, your top of the funnel content is all well and good unless it does not move the buyer further down the funnel. So, here's the key, we have to have some sort of actionable tasks that you want your buyer persona to take in this content. You'll hear us asking you to take the next step. What we want you to do is, we want you to come to our website, we want you to download a resource, we want you to subscribe, we want you to join our groups and by doing that you're taking the next level.

 

You're coming in, the waters warm, everybody's happy and then if you find this content engaging, well maybe there's a deeper dive. So I'm going to give you a call to action on every one of these shows and what I'm trying to do here is not just for our own sake but to teach you as well that you- your educational content, your top of the funnel content should have very clear call to action and ask if they are ready to take the next step.

 

So that is important and once they have taken the next step, now we can begin to nurture them as leads and we can begin to build the conversation about how we can help them in terms of actually selling something to them that they want. And, of course, this is all them making the move. This is not us going out and prospecting or cold calling. This is them coming in through the show and then taking the next step.

 

Once they are in the sales funnel, in the middle of the sales funnel, that's when we'll ask them politely. Would you like to learn more about this and schedule a consultation. For us we're not selling a product, so we don't have an e-commerce site or anything like that so the conversion for us is when you schedule a consultation. When you raise your hand and you say, yeah I would like to know more about video marketing, I'd love to talk about that with my marketing manager or my team. That to us is a conversion and then from there we can move it to sales and let sales team do their job.

 

That way we can tie everything that we do back to from all the stuff at the top of the funnel, we can tie it all the way back to actual revenue and we can look in our CRM and we can see that Mindy came in from the show, she engaged in the show for you know three or four weeks, she watched these episodes, she came she liked us on Facebook, then she downloaded the resource guide that we created and then she opened our emails, she clicked on her emails, she went to our website, she read our content and then you know what she did, she scheduled a consultation and then next thing you know, we're best buddies and we are customers or we're customer and service company.

 

So, that's how it should work, it doesn't always work exactly like that but when it does work, that's when you know you've hit a home run and that's when you can justify the budget for something like this and you can even increase the budget to get a bigger reach. I don't know guys, that's how you grow. That's how you grow in a nutshell.

Renia:

Love it. Can you show them an example of this Matt? Like what would a call-to-action for the show today be?

Matt:

Yes. As we wrap up today, I know we went a little bit over but here's your call-to-action. If you're listening to the stuff that we've been talking about and it is interesting to you, then I encourage you to take a deeper dive and visit industrialmarketing101.com and speaking of engaging video content you're going to find more of that there. At that landing page you'll see that there's a video there that describes the industrial buyers journey, how it's changing and then you're going to get access to five awesome full-length videos about how to navigate the new industrial buyer’s journey.

 

I think you'll find that very engaging it'll come through a series of emails and at any point during that time if you would like to write me back an email or talk about it further you can do that as well, they'll be coming from me. But that is your call to action today industrialmarketing101.com.

Renia:

Can I give something away?

Matt:

Yeah.

Renia:

I'm going to pick on Lief, he doesn't know I'm doing this.

Lief:

You're not giving me away, right?

Matt:

I love this live stuff.

Renia:

I'm not giving you ... I have do stuff like this, right. So, Lief has been behind the scenes making these amazing shows happen for us every week but he's also behind the scenes with all of our clients making these great videos happen for them. We bet some of you that have been hanging with us for a while probably have some educational videos of your own, you have some stuff of your own that you've produced. I want to give a little bit of Lief's genius to you. I'm going to volunteer you.

Lief:

Okay.

Renia:

All right. If you post a link to your video, so your educational video in the comments below, whether you're watching this on YouTube or you're watching it on Facebook, you're listening to the podcast, you'll have to hop over to one of those places. Leave it in the comments, Lief will watch it and he will give you three tips on how to make the next one better.

Lief:

Love it.

Renia:

Can you do that for me? I can volunteer you?

Lief:

As long as they're not an hour apiece.

Renia:

So we want to let everybody-

Matt:

That'll be your first tip.

Lief:

My first tip.

Matt:

Keep it short.

Renia:

We want to let everybody see what everybody else is doing, hopefully learning about how to be more effective with their marketing Lief spent on a couple of times, and we want to help you guys get better whether you're using a whole studio production like we are or whether you're doing it from your phone. Drop your video in the comments and Lief will watch it and leave you some feedback.

Lief:

Nice.

Renia:

Awesome. Thank you so much for hanging out with us this week guys, these are my favorite ones where we get to get all down and dirty about what we've been through. Join us next week for a super dry conversation that's going to make your boss really happy, Matt loves this conversation, next week we're going to talk about how to get the most out of your co-op, right Matt.

Matt:

Yes. We're going to talk all about co-op, manufacturer development funds, whatever you want to call them. This is you working with your distributors or if you're distributor working with your suppliers to help grow the business. We'll have some great tips for you. We've been doing this a lot for a long time so we'll share the best practices on how to use co-op in a way that gets approved but actually moves the needle.

Renia:

Hint, it's not T-shirts.

Matt:

Or stress balls, or any of that stuff.

Renia:

Thanks for being with us guys, we're looking forward to talk to you about that next week don't forget to leave your comment with your videos for Lief and we will see you next week.

Matt:

Bye guys.

Lief:

Bye.

Renia:

Hey everybody thanks for joining us. If you're just getting started with us on Grow Live, be sure to check out some of our favorite episodes in the show notes.

Matt:

Don't forget that you can see us live on Facebook every Wednesday at noon or you can find us on YouTube and binge past episodes in full HD.

Renia:

If you found this helpful and you want to see more, leave us a review and we'll enter you for a chance to win some Grow Live swag. Thanks again everybody.

 

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Topics: Marketing, Trade Shows, Sales, Grow Live, industrial marketing, digital marketing, resources, sales professional

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